Author Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop  (Read 15305 times)

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Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #600 on: November 07, 2019, 12:56:58 AM »

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #601 on: November 07, 2019, 01:02:49 AM »
Haha yeah that is the most famous story, probably a myth.  I don't think it's an accident, though, that, as you head east from Vienna, you get phyllo dough and then, in Turkey and down into the Levant, the fantastically elaborate forms of baklava with pistachios and rosewater that make the usual Greek-restaurant stuff (which the idiots insist on microwaving, turning it to mush) seem like peasant food -- that whole laminated-dough thing has an eastern feel to it.

You can buy gluten to supplement grocery-store flour -- I dump a little Bob's Red Mill Vital Wheat Gluten in practically everything which makes the dough stretchier and hold more liquid so less flour is necessary.  For the sweet doughs I make I am always trying to get by with as little flour as possible.  I don't measure anything but I know when I overdo it the dough resembles rubber cement so the effect is perceptible, not just some mysterious take-it-on-faith thing.

I find that lard is the essential ingredient to a heavenly leaven'd-ough...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-3ESjm9iQ8

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #602 on: November 28, 2019, 07:31:29 PM »
"Orange Man Bad Souffles"

 

Made a dozen of the bad boys today.  I have to say they were damn good.  It's a sweet potato soufflé garnished with a toasted marshmallow gastrique and candied pecans on the side, there is also some chiffonade sage.

I made my sister the saucier and put her in charge of the plates, I wanted whole sage, but she insisted on chiffonade.  It was really there for color, although I have a theory that sage is pretty good with sweet potatoes.

It went over pretty well, most of the family tried it.  There were two complete abstentions, a few samplings but most ate the whole thing.  The toasted marshmallow gastrique was awesome.  I think this is restaurant quality, with a few caveats:  I made the sweet potato custard base really thick because I wanted a lot of sweet potato flavor.  SO there were a lot of mashed sweet potatos in the custard, which made it pretty heavy.  I think if the custard base was played with a bit more there would be even more loft to the soufflés.  The plus side to this is that they didn't tend to collapse too much.

Unfortunately the color of the designs on the plates we used was roughly the color of the gastrique, so it doesn't show up very well...

Here's the basic recipe for anyone who wants to attempt making these for themselves, if you love sweet potatos I think you'd really like it.

Sweet Potato Souffle
yield 2 soufflés (425F oven)
1 egg yolk
1 tsp sugar
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/2 cup mashed sweet potatos
2 egg whites.

For the mashed sweets lightly oil whole skin on sweet potatos and baked them for an hour in a 350F oven, allow them to cool then squeeze the cooked "meat" out.  About an hour before service make a custard out of all ingredients except the egg whites; a double boiler is recommended so as not to curdle the custard reserve the egg whites.  Allow the custard to cool.  Right before putting the soufflés into the oven whip the egg whites to stiff peaks, but still slightly moist and fold in the custard.  Have 2 oven proof ramekins lightly buttered then coated with sugar, divide the "batter" between the two and immediately place in a 425F oven for 15-20 minutes.  When they are done serve immediately, because the soufflé will collapse within a few minutes.  It will still be edible, but it much better when it is puffed up.  Jorches need to be aware that it is really hot and can burn that dangly thing in the back of your throat.

Marshmallow Gastrique
2-4 toasted marshmallow
2 Tablespoons apple cider vinegar
dash of Quatre Epices (white pepper, nutmeg, cloves and dried ginger all ground up)

Toast the marshmallows over the burner on the stove.  In a small pan heat up the apple cider vinegar and quarter-spice, melt the marshmallows in the vinegar one at a time until the sauce just coats the back of a spoon.  Can be served warm or cold, easier to serve warm.

Candied Pecans
Butter
Sugar
Dash cayenne pepper
Whole pecans

Melt the butter, sugar and cayenne pepper until the sugar dissolves.  Toss pecans and evenly coat, bake in a 350F oven until toasted.

----------------

I am wild ass guessing on the Gastrique & Pecan recipes as my sister made both of those.  I watched her make the gastrique, but she doesn't measure things so that one is an approximation, the Candied Pecans?  NO clue, she made those ahead of time.  But she was instructed to put just a little cayenne pepper on them.  Not to make them "spicy" but to just give them a mild almost un-noticeable "bite."  I could only taste the cayenne when I ate the pecans by themselves (which was really easy, they were delicious).  Grate Job, Baby sister!

I actually made all of the soufflés at once, so if you multiply everything by 6 in the soufflé recipe you'd get a dozen.  They were really good, got a family 75% approval rating.  Most people would not normally eat sweet potatos.  I think my mother and I were the only ones who do eat them, so I'd say a crowd pleaser but a bit of a hassle to make...

Happy Thanksgurving evrahbody!

-p

ediot: You don't have to, but my sister actually went to the trouble of actually making marshmallows from scratch.  They were very square:

 

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #603 on: November 29, 2019, 10:53:14 PM »
"Orange Man Bad Souffles"


Your post made me smile... Happy thanksgiving, Pate.

ediot: Happy thinks giving Bellgab...  ;)

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #604 on: November 30, 2019, 04:37:49 PM »
"Orange Man Bad Souffles"

 

Made a dozen of the bad boys today.  I have to say they were damn good.  It's a sweet potato soufflé garnished with a toasted marshmallow gastrique and candied pecans on the side, there is also some chiffonade sage.

I made my sister the saucier and put her in charge of the plates, I wanted whole sage, but she insisted on chiffonade.  It was really there for color, although I have a theory that sage is pretty good with sweet potatoes.

It went over pretty well, most of the family tried it.  There were two complete abstentions, a few samplings but most ate the whole thing.  The toasted marshmallow gastrique was awesome.  I think this is restaurant quality, with a few caveats:  I made the sweet potato custard base really thick because I wanted a lot of sweet potato flavor.  SO there were a lot of mashed sweet potatos in the custard, which made it pretty heavy.  I think if the custard base was played with a bit more there would be even more loft to the soufflés.  The plus side to this is that they didn't tend to collapse too much.

Unfortunately the color of the designs on the plates we used was roughly the color of the gastrique, so it doesn't show up very well...

Here's the basic recipe for anyone who wants to attempt making these for themselves, if you love sweet potatos I think you'd really like it.

Sweet Potato Souffle
yield 2 soufflés (425F oven)
1 egg yolk
1 tsp sugar
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/2 cup mashed sweet potatos
2 egg whites.

For the mashed sweets lightly oil whole skin on sweet potatos and baked them for an hour in a 350F oven, allow them to cool then squeeze the cooked "meat" out.  About an hour before service make a custard out of all ingredients except the egg whites; a double boiler is recommended so as not to curdle the custard reserve the egg whites.  Allow the custard to cool.  Right before putting the soufflés into the oven whip the egg whites to stiff peaks, but still slightly moist and fold in the custard.  Have 2 oven proof ramekins lightly buttered then coated with sugar, divide the "batter" between the two and immediately place in a 425F oven for 15-20 minutes.  When they are done serve immediately, because the soufflé will collapse within a few minutes.  It will still be edible, but it much better when it is puffed up.  Jorches need to be aware that it is really hot and can burn that dangly thing in the back of your throat.

Marshmallow Gastrique
2-4 toasted marshmallow
2 Tablespoons apple cider vinegar
dash of Quatre Epices (white pepper, nutmeg, cloves and dried ginger all ground up)

Toast the marshmallows over the burner on the stove.  In a small pan heat up the apple cider vinegar and quarter-spice, melt the marshmallows in the vinegar one at a time until the sauce just coats the back of a spoon.  Can be served warm or cold, easier to serve warm.

Candied Pecans
Butter
Sugar
Dash cayenne pepper
Whole pecans

Melt the butter, sugar and cayenne pepper until the sugar dissolves.  Toss pecans and evenly coat, bake in a 350F oven until toasted.

----------------

I am wild ass guessing on the Gastrique & Pecan recipes as my sister made both of those.  I watched her make the gastrique, but she doesn't measure things so that one is an approximation, the Candied Pecans?  NO clue, she made those ahead of time.  But she was instructed to put just a little cayenne pepper on them.  Not to make them "spicy" but to just give them a mild almost un-noticeable "bite."  I could only taste the cayenne when I ate the pecans by themselves (which was really easy, they were delicious).  Grate Job, Baby sister!

I actually made all of the soufflés at once, so if you multiply everything by 6 in the soufflé recipe you'd get a dozen.  They were really good, got a family 75% approval rating.  Most people would not normally eat sweet potatos.  I think my mother and I were the only ones who do eat them, so I'd say a crowd pleaser but a bit of a hassle to make...

Happy Thanksgurving evrahbody!

-p

ediot: You don't have to, but my sister actually went to the trouble of actually making marshmallows from scratch.  They were very square:

 


A credit to your race and a man of both ambition and intellect, willing to try new things. And help solve the schisms in our country. Bravo! NPR, JNTimes,etc all hand-wringing about politics over holidays. Instead. You solve by baking!Having a second Thanksgiving today (we switch off etc with inlaws n what-not.) My contribution is basic. Green bean casserol. But I watch it like a hawk or like when I bbq. Excuse to drink. And in keeping with Midwest Scandahoovian forebearers...what can be better than something made with condensed soup?

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #605 on: December 01, 2019, 08:24:42 PM »
I have been waiting to hear that K_Dubb served perfect Yorkshire puddings, and beef Wellington for dinner this year...

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #606 on: December 01, 2019, 08:36:04 PM »
I have been waiting to hear that K_Dubb served perfect Yorkshire puddings, and beef Wellington for dinner this year...

Oh no I come from a big family and am still far down on the rungs.  I was upgraded from sweet potatoes to pie this year, though, and I did pretty good -- crust was crispy, not soggy, even underneath, though I baked them a few minutes too long and the fillings had a few cracks.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #607 on: December 01, 2019, 09:09:50 PM »
Oh no I come from a big family and am still far down on the rungs.  I was upgraded from sweet potatoes to pie this year, though, and I did pretty good -- crust was crispy, not soggy, even underneath, though I baked them a few minutes too long and the fillings had a few cracks.

It sounds to me that you missed a golden opportunity to "wow them" with you culinary skills and leap-frog a few rungs ahead this year. Serving perfect, individual pies to your family members might have won them over...



*For reference- it is a butter tart.  ;)

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #608 on: December 01, 2019, 09:33:36 PM »
It sounds to me that you missed a golden opportunity to "wow them" with you culinary skills and leap-frog a few rungs ahead this year. Serving perfect, individual pies to your family members might have won them over...



*For reference- it is a butter tart.  ;)

Hahaha yes butter tart!  But commit an innovation?  I would have had a revolt -- let no new thing arise!  I inherited the pies from my mom and was already skating on thin ice roasting and mashing (and reducing -- otherwise it's too watery) my own pumpkins instead of using Libbys canned and using fresh heavy cream instead of nasty evaporated milk.  I think that old recipe is a conspiracy between canned-goods manufacturers perpetuated since it's about the only reason for evaporated milk to exist these days.  I was on tenterhooks all during dinner and held my breath when dessert was served but nobody said a word.  Which is the best outcome I could have hoped for.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #609 on: December 01, 2019, 09:47:30 PM »
Oh no I come from a big family and am still far down on the rungs.  I was upgraded from sweet potatoes to pie this year, though, and I did pretty good -- crust was crispy, not soggy, even underneath, though I baked them a few minutes too long and the fillings had a few cracks.

I saw ny sussTarr attempt a Betty Croker crust pie..,.

Lardy?

-p

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #610 on: December 01, 2019, 09:57:03 PM »
I saw ny sussTarr attempt a Betty Croker crust pie..,.

Lardy?

-p

No, pate sucree with butter, yolks and cream, not pre-baked.  I think the sugar helps it brown on the bottom quicker and hold up to the custard.

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop
« Reply #611 on: December 13, 2019, 01:55:41 AM »

VC

Bakegab: The Bellgab Bakeshop K_Dubb's Nordic Baking Podcast 1.0
« Reply #612 on: December 24, 2019, 05:39:25 PM »
What's your favorite Christmas and/or New Year's baking recipe that you love most to eat if possible?

Link to download K_Dubb's Nordic Baking Podcast with Artisan Music is here:

 

OP is here:

A perfect complimentary rise to Roswells, Art and K_Dubb's baking thread. Well worth its pan-spermia even if you don't shake and bake or eat it. This is an amazing production about historic Nordic and Northern European baking and mythos with recordings of K_Dubb's handmade artisan music too! Download and save it here:

 

Inspirational to bake some historic and traditional breads and whatever else K_Dubb is up to in his shape shifting impish hard-on baking thread. :D